FAQ

Learn more about Prop CC and get the detailed answers to your questions here:

  1. What will Prop CC do?
  2. Why do we need Prop CC?
  3. How can I get involved to help pass Prop CC?
  4. Who wants to defeat Prop CC—and what can we do to stop them?
  5. I want to vote YES on Prop CC. How and when can I vote?
  6. I thought that the marijuana tax money went to schools. Why do schools need more money?
  7. How will my district/school/student be helped if Prop CC passes?
  8. Will Prop CC increase taxes?
  9. The state legislature already voted to approve this. Why do I have to vote on this, too?
  10. What can Prop CC money be spent on?
  11. If Prop CC passes, will it guarantee that money will go to the schools?
  12. How much money will my district get?
  13. Is this the same as my School District’s mill or bond?
  14. What questions should I ask my school board candidate?

Are you looking for these same FAQs in Spanish? Find them here.

What will Prop CC do?

Coloradans will have a chance to support kids, teachers, and communities by voting YES for Prop CC by November 5, 2019. We want to be as proud of our schools as we are of our state!

Here’s how it works: Prop CC will allow Colorado to keep all funds already collected under the current tax rates. Anything that is above the current revenue cap will be distributed directly into K-12 education (as well as higher ed and transportation). It won’t eliminate Colorado’s budget woes, but it’s a great step forward—and a step that won’t raise taxes.

Who supports it: Prop CC is supported by students, teachers, community members, and activists across the state. 

Here’s what it does (and doesn’t do):

Raise Taxes?

No

Amend the Constitution?

No

Change any existing formulas?

No

Follow TABOR?

Yes

Define how dollars will be spent?

Yes

Help students, teachers, schools, and communities

YES

 

 

 

Why do we need Prop CC?

Colorado isn't a poor state. Wouldn't it be great if it stopped acting like one? 

  • Nearly 60% of school districts across the state have four-day school weeks
  • Despite our booming economy, Colorado ranks LAST in the U.S. in wage competitiveness for teachers
  • Colorado needs to spend $2,700 MORE per pupil just to meet the national average, but we just don’t have the funding
  • We owe our schools more than $8 BILLION of money that was taken and never replaced since the Great Recession

Out-of-state billionaires are already funding our opposition. They want to take money away from our kids’ education — but we won’t let that happen. 

Here’s why education funding is so bad in Colorado: Because of our current tax laws, also known as TABOR, Colorado isn’t even allowed to invest all our current tax revenue without a vote of the people. Voting YES on Prop CC will help untangle Colorado’s broken tax system.

 

 

How can I get involved to help pass Prop CC?

 

Who wants to defeat Prop CC—and what can we do to stop them?

Money has been pouring into our opposition from wealthy out-of-state interests. No surprise: it’s from a bunch of super rich people outside of Colorado. 

Instead of trying to make Colorado’s schools better and Colorado’s future brighter, they want to take our state funds away from our schools, kids, and teachers. 

We can fight them, but we will need every person we can get to join us. When we band together, we can make a difference and build our movement. Start now by making a donation of any size! 

 

 

I want to vote YES on Prop CC. How and when can I vote?

Election Day is November 5, 2019, but your ballot will get sent to you the week of October 15th. Mail or turn in your ballot with a YES for Prop CC as soon as you can.

Our opponents—super wealthy outsiders who want to take Colorado kids’ funding for schools—are counting on the fact that we aren’t paying attention to the election in 2019. But we are going to prove them wrong. 

Check your voter registration now

 

Here are more important election dates:

Date

Event

Information

Oct. 14

22-day Colorado residency deadline

You must be a resident of Colorado for at least 22 days before the election in order to vote 

Oct. 15

Ballots are mailed to all registered voters

 

Oct. 15 - Nov. 5

As soon as you receive your ballot in the mail, you can vote

Where to vote, location of ballot boxes, and what’s on the ballot, election results, and contact information for your county clerk and recorder. 

Oct. 28

Last day to request a mail in ballot

 

Nov. 5

Election Day*

Polls close at 7:00 p.m. You can register to vote at your polling location. If you are in line at 7:00 p.m. you will be allowed to cast your vote, Mailed ballots must be received by 7 p.m. A postmark does not count.

*All ballots (including mail-in ballots) must be in the hands of your county clerk and recorder by 7 p.m. on Election Day

Additional Voting Information

  • Colorado has same day registration. This means you can register and vote up to November 5th at 7 p.m. 
  • Find where to vote, location of ballot boxes, what’s on the ballot, election results, and contact information for your county clerk and recorder. 
  • An individual can accept up to 9 ballots (10 including their own) and turn them into a ballot drop box per election. If you take someone’s ballot (with their permission) to turn in you must immediately turn that ballot in. You can not take it home and wait until a later date to turn it in. You may not alter or open the ballot. 

The most common mistakes on ballots are as follows:

  • No signature on the required signature line
  • If you are a first-time voter, you will need to include a photocopy of your ID inside your ballot. If you vote at a polling location, you will be asked for your ID the first time you vote and will not need to provide a photocopy.
  • The ballot bubbles not being filled in completely 
  • Voters missing the back of the ballots if there is more than one side

 

I thought that the marijuana tax money went to schools. Why do schools need more money?

When Colorado legalized recreational marijuana, there was a lot of talk about that money helping schools. So what happened? 

Colorado Public Radio did an excellent piece called Where Does All the Marijuana Money Go? Colorado’s Pot Taxes Explained (October 2018) that explains where it goes. Check out Great Education’s infographic where we break down what happened, step by step:

Graphic source: Great Education Colorado

 

 

How will my district/school/student be helped if Prop CC passes?

This is probably the most important question you could ask! If Prop CC passes, your district will receive dollars to spend on one-time expenses. Find out exactly what that looks like for your district by searching Colorado Association of School Boards' Prop CC fact sheets in English and Spanish.

This means that dollars cannot go to ongoing costs like teacher salaries or adding staff members. But Prop CC funds can go to critical needs like building repairs, books or computers, or creating incentives to retain and attract quality teachers for our classrooms.

Did you know that:
  • Colorado schools have over $17 billion in capital construction needs
  • Colorado teachers spend an average of $656 on their own classroom supplies every year
  • CO teachers make 21.4% less than comparable college graduates  

 

Will Prop CC increase taxes?

No. Prop CC will NOT increase taxes. It’s right there in the ballot language. 

Here’s exactly what your ballot will say: Without raising taxes and to better fund public schools, higher education, and roads, bridges, and transit, within a balanced budget, may the state keep and spend all the revenue it annually collects after June 30, 2019, but is not currently allowed to keep and spend under Colorado law, with an annual independent audit to show how the retained revenues are spent?” 

Does funding public schools seem like a good idea to you? We agree! 

Here’s what it does (and doesn’t do):

Raise Taxes?

No

Amend the Constitution?

No

Change any existing formulas?

No

Follow TABOR?

Yes

Define how dollars will be spent?

Yes

Help students, teachers, schools, and communities

YES

 

 

 

The state legislature already voted to approve this. Why do I have to vote on this, too?

Great question! 

The Colorado Constitution requires Colorado voters to make tax policy. Our elected officials passed a bill to put Prop CC on the ballot, so that Colorado students can benefit from our strong economy, but they need our votes to make it happen. 

Will Prop CC change the constitution in Colorado?

Prop CC will NOT change the constitution in Colorado. Instead, it does what our current tax law (called TABOR) requires: asks voters to keep revenue beyond TABOR’s arbitrary and antiquated limits.

Here’s what it does (and doesn’t do):

Raise Taxes?

No

Amend the Constitution?

No

Change any existing formulas?

No

Follow TABOR?

Yes

Define how dollars will be spent?

Yes

Help students, teachers, schools, and communities

YES

 

 

 

What can Prop CC money be spent on?

Prop CC money will be divided equally between public education, higher education and transportation. For K-12 education, each district will receive funding that can be spent on one-time expenses. 

This means that dollars cannot go to ongoing costs like teacher salaries or adding staff members. But Prop CC funds can go to critical needs like building repairs, books or computers, or creating incentives to retain and attract quality teachers for our classrooms.

Did you know that:

  • Colorado schools have over $17 billion in capital construction needs
  • Colorado teachers spend an average of $656 on their own classroom supplies every year
  • CO teachers make 21.4% less than comparable college graduates

 

 

If Prop CC passes, will it guarantee that money will go to the schools?

The ballot language of the proposition ensures that money will be split evenly between K-12 education, higher education, and transportation. Here’s exactly what your ballot will say:

Without raising taxes and to better fund public schools, higher education, and roads, bridges, and transit, within a balanced budget, may the state keep and spend all the revenue it annually collects after June 30, 2019, but is not currently allowed to keep and spend under Colorado law, with an annual independent audit to show how the retained revenues are spent?” 

Does funding public schools seem like a good idea to you? We think so! 

 

 

How much money will my district get?

While the total number will fluctuate every year based on the annual tax revenue, Colorado Association of School Boards has produced a Prop CC fact sheet for each district in English and Spanish.

This means that a stronger economy for Colorado results in more funding for schools.

 

 

Is this the same as my School District’s mill or bond?

School districts can ask local voters to pay additional property taxes through a mill levy override or bond campaign. Prop CC is different from your district’s mill or bond because it will provide funding for the entire state. 

For K-12 education funding, each district will receive funding that can be spent on one-time expenses. This means that dollars cannot go to ongoing costs like teacher salaries or adding staff members. But Prop CC funds can go to critical needs like building repairs, books or computers, or creating incentives to retain and attract quality teachers for our classrooms.

What’s a mill or bond campaign? Mill levy override (MLO) campaigns are used when districts need additional dollars for general operating costs. Bond campaigns are used when districts need one-time dollars for capital construction projects. 

 

 

What questions should I ask my school board candidate?

Public education voters believe every school board candidate should stand up for Colorado kids and teachers.

Here are four questions you can ask each candidate: 
  • What will you do as a school board member to advocate for state funding?
  • What will you do to make sure that all diverse communities get to participate in the budgeting process?
  • What does a school that embodies equity and inclusion look like to you?
  • Do you support Prop CC?

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